Category Archives: 1930s

Reporter, actress, find love in “Next Time…”

Next Time We Love, a 1936 “struggling marriage” melodrama with a young James Stewart as a reporter and Margaret Sullavan as his aspiring actress wife, was adapted for radio repeatedly, including versions with Stewart and the very different Jimmy Cagney as … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, adaptations, foreign correspondents, marriages, reporters | Leave a comment

Journalistic aspirations at Vic and Sade

The classic radio comedy “Vic and Sade” by Paul Rhymer had no journalist characters appear at its microphones, as far as I know, although the main characters were regular newspaper readers… but Vic Gook did discuss writing for the paper … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, 1940s, comedy, newspaper readers, Old Time Radio Groups | 1 Comment

Happy Birthday, Mr. Pulitzer

Publisher Joseph Pulitzer — of the New York World and St. Louis Post-Dispatch — was born on April 10 (in 1847), which is as good an excuse as any to offer two versions of his biography as presented to radio … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, 19th century, editors, New York City, newspaper crusades, publishers, Pulitzer Prize, true stories | Leave a comment

Radioplays and women in journalism

Happy International Women’s Day! For some crime-solving by a non-fictional woman journalist, see last year’s International Women’s Day episode of JHeroes. This year, we’ll start with fiction and get back to reality — including women war correspondents —  before the … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, 1940s, 19th century, adaptations, cavalcade, GreenHornet, historical figures, Lois Lane, true stories, women, World War II | Leave a comment

Covering the Waterfront

Two of my former Emerson College students have wound up with new jobs back in Massachusetts at the New Bedford Standard-Times on Buzzard’s Bay, which is a fine excuse to post this item about the radio and film stories titled … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, 1950s, Drama, reporters | Leave a comment

Doctor still thinks reporter is crazy

Half-way into this half-hour broadcast of The March of Time, February 3, 1938, we get to hear a newspaper reporter sign himself into a mental hospital as a patient — only to have trouble getting out. Stories about New York’s … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, New York City, newspapers, radio, reporting, The March of Time, true stories, undercover | Leave a comment

Halloween journalists on old-time radio

The obvious choice for a Halloween-week radio show incorporating journalist characters in a dramatic production has to be Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater broadcast of “War of the Worlds.” Welles’ dramatic technique of imitating radio news alerts, simulating interruption of a … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, Orson Welles, radio, science fiction, science reporting, sensationalism | 2 Comments