His Girl Friday & The Front Page

Hildy Johnson and Walter Burns on the air

by Bob Stepno

Radio couldn’t show the feet on the desks, the poker game in the courthouse newsroom. But the broadcast adaptations of The Front Page and His Girl Friday conveyed at least some of the originals’ mixed messages about the press.

An example from the script of His Girl Friday:

BURNS
… You’re a newspaperman.

HILDY
That’s why I’m quitting. I want to go some place where I can be a woman.

BURNS
I know you, Hildy, and I know what it would mean. It would kill you.

HILDY
A journalist! Peeking through keyholes — running after fire engines — waking people up in the middle of the night to ask them if they think Hitler’s going to start a war — stealing pictures off old ladies of their daughters that got chased by apemen! I know all about reporters — a lot of daffy buttinskies going around without a nickel in their pockets, and for what? So a million hired girls and motormen’s wives will know what’s going on! No, Walter, I’m through.

Both the film “His Girl Friday” (1940) and the hit 1928 play and 1931 film that inspired it, “The Front Page,” were adapted for radio more than once. A few of the productions are available as MP3 files. In the list below, click the series name to download or to play the file on an iPad or other device that doesn’t show a player icon.

The original play was by former newspapermen Ben Hecht and Charles McArthur, a send-up of journalistic excesses and urban political corruption, based on their experiences in Chicago a decade earlier.

In all cases, the adaptations stay close to the basic outline: Hildy Johnson, reporter, wants to quit the business and get married. Walter Burns, editor, doesn’t want to lose his star. In the background, there are a convicted man, a hangman’s scaffold, a courthouse newsroom full of cynical reporters, and an incompetent and corrupt sheriff and mayor.

The dialogue is rapid-fire — but possibly slowed down a bit for radio, which couldn’t rely on raised-eyebrows and double-takes to underscore punchlines.

Both the movies and the radio adaptations couldn’t be as naughty as Broadway, even cutting a famous “son-of-a-bitch” punchline as the final curtain came down. Radio scriptwriters also may have skipped a double-entendre here or there.

Are the radio adaptations still fun for new audiences, or do they mostly serve as reminders for people who already saw the play or films?  I’ve written a bit about Hildy’s gender-change here and may add more discussion at a later date.

His Girl Friday — Screen Guild Theater 1941
Rosalind Russell and Cary Grant present a compressed version of their already fast-moving film in this 30-minute 1941 adaptation of the 1940 film. But that wasn’t the first radio version. The film came out in January 1940; in September, Lux Radio Theater had it on the air with a different cast.

His Girl Friday — Lux Radio Theater 1940
Not Rosalind Russell and Cary Grant, this hour-long version has Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray, and a tongue in cheek opening address to the press from Cecil B. DeMille.


As with the original films, “The Front Page” (with a male Hildy Johnson) made it to the air a few years before the Hildy-is-a-lady re-incarnation. This hour-long version is memorable for having a real newspaperman playing Hildy: Walter Winchell.

The Front Page — Lux Radio Theater 1937
The original stars of the 1931 film, Pat O’Brien as Hildy and Adolphe Menjou as Walter Burns, the role that brought him an Oscar nomination, did a half-hour Academy Award Theater adaptation on radio in 1946. (Lee Tracy, who played Hildy on Broadway, also played the role in a radio version, but so far I haven’t found an online source for that performance.)

The Front Page — Academy Award Theater 1946

Ford Theater’s 1948 production may have come closest to the 1928 Broadway original thanks to the script treatment by the distinguished critic, editor and playwright Gilbert Seldes, the younger brother of long time journalist George Seldes and one of the first critics to take seriously “The Lively Arts” of popular culture.

Gilbert Seldes was later to become the first director of television for CBS News and founding dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. He was also the father of actress Marian Seldes.

Ford Theater was a high-quality anthology series that ran for only two years, just as television was beginning to cut into the audience for evening home entertainment.

All of these MP3 files are from the Old Time Radio collection at archive.org.

Copies of the films are also available for streaming or downloading at archive.org:

For more about the movies, including two more recent re-makes, see the Internet Movie Database, IMDB.com

 

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