Category Archives: ethics

Reporter had spunk, but soup-opera didn’t last long

Jane Endicott, Reporter — premiere, January 5, 1942: https://ia600201.us.archive.org/7/items/Singles_And_Doubles_Singles_A-C/42-01-05xxxJaneEndicottReporter.mp3 I’ve had this short-lived series tucked away on my “Soaps and Romance” page, although these adventures of a young woman reporter are not a typical soap-opera or romance series with cliff-hanger … Continue reading

Posted in 1940s, Drama, editors, ethics, journalism, women | Leave a comment

A young reporter’s ethical growing pains

Listening to more of Mickey Rooney’s unsuccessful “Shorty Bell” series from 1948 — after reading obituaries and tributes to him this week — I can’t help wondering what the audience wanted from his radio newspaper-journalism vehicle: A lighter family-friendly “Andy … Continue reading

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“I am not ‘in the news’…” — The Couple Next Door

Journalism students should find food for ethical thought in this encounter between a newspaper reporter and “The Couple Next Door.”  Prelude: Little Betsy got a bad mark at school; all the children laughed at her… and just for repeating something … Continue reading

Posted in 1950s, 1960s, children, comedy, ethics, newspaper readers, reporters | Leave a comment

Lime with a twist: Violets, Violence and Recycled Radio

Here’s a special case of radio recycling, another Orson Welles’ script from “The Lives of Harry Lime,” turned into a “Europe Confidential” journalist-hero script a few years later, part of a pattern I began writing about some months ago. This … Continue reading

Posted in 1950s, adaptations, Drama, ethics, Europe, foreign correspondents, Orson Welles | Leave a comment

Newspaper says Yale cheats; Merriwell to the rescue

Last time it was scrappy Boston reporters heading for Connecticut to cover Yale-Harvard baseball. This week we jump to another sport and season, to watch an investigative New Haven newspaperman get the scent of a sports scandal for a Front … Continue reading

Posted in 1900s, 1940s, adaptations, ethics, journalism, newspapers, reporting, sports | Leave a comment

Clark Kent, super burglar or stupid bungler?

Being on the side of truth and justice appears to have justified some “might means right” tactics in Clark Kent’s early reporting repertoire, including burglary, threats, assault and kidnapping. For example, in this sequence from the second year of the … Continue reading

Posted in 1940s, adventure, Clark Kent, ethics, Jimmy Olsen, Perry White, reporting, Superman | Leave a comment

Clark Kent, unethical sports reporter?

“You’re a reporter, not a detective,” Perry White to Clark Kent. The month of March madness seems an odd season to be writing about football, but here goes — with a tale that demonstrates that there were sometimes shades of … Continue reading

Posted in 1940s, Clark Kent, ethics, Lois Lane, Perry White, sports, Superman | 2 Comments

Wasp and Hornet — Journalistic Vigilantes

It’s been a year since Seth Rogen’s “Green Hornet” movie did its violence to the legend of the old radio hero by that name, whose newspaperman secret identity might have been portrayed as more of a role model for journalism … Continue reading

Posted in 1940s, crime, ethics, GreenHornet, journalism, movies, novels | Leave a comment

Editor’s New Year Help from Investigative Twins

From Dec. 30, 1953, here’s what was regularly billed as “another heartwarming story of a country newspaper and its friendly editor.” The series is “Rogers of the Gazette,” starring Will Rogers Jr. This episode starts with the editor giving a … Continue reading

Posted in 1950s, editors, ethics, journalism, local news, newspapers, reporters, teaching | Leave a comment

America Has Room at the Inn — in Big Town

“The power and the freedom of the press is a flaming sword; that it may be a faithful servant of all the people, use it justly. Hold it high. Guard it well!” Writer Jerry McGill, a former newspaperman, and the … Continue reading

Posted in 1940s, cold war, editors, ethics, international, newspapers, World War II | Leave a comment